Culture Point 5 – Tejime (手締め)

Tejime (手締め) is a Japanese custom of ceremonial rhythmic hand clapping, typically accompanied by enthusiastic exclamation by the participants, performed at the end of a special event to bring the occasion to a peaceful, lively close.

Tejime begins by a call from the leader, typically “ote wo haishaku” (お手を拝借), after which the participants, just before clapping their hands, usually yell “iyō’o” (イヨーオ), “yo” (ヨッ) or “mō itchō” (もう一丁) in order to synchronize timing.

There are various ways of clapping hands. The main types are:


Itchō-jime (一丁締め), which consists of a single clap.
The Edo-style tejime:
 – Ippon-jime (一本締め), which consists of three sets of three claps and one final clap (3-3-3-1);
 – Sanbon-jime (三本締め), which consists of three ippon-jime, i.e. three three sets of three claps and one final clap (3-3-3-1 3-3-3-1 3-3-3-1).

This custom is really common around here, and I have done it many times! In parties in the orchestra, in the end of omikoshi parades, etc.

Nothing better than watching an example! Have a look at the video below!


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